Skip 
Navigation Link

1527 Albia Road
Ottumwa, Iowa 52501
Phone: (641) 682-8772
Fax: (641) 682-1924

Introduction to Aging and Geriatrics

Aging & Geriatrics

Great improvements in medicine, public health, science, and technology have enabled today's older Americans to live longer and healthier lives than previous generations. Older adults want to remain healthy and independent at home in their communities. Society wants to minimize the health care and economic costs associated with an increasing older population. The science of aging indicates that chronic disease and disability are not inevitable. As a result, health promotion and disease prevention activities and programs are an increasing priority for older adults, their families, and the health care system.

Many people fail to make the connection between undertaking healthy behaviors today and the impact of these choices later in life. Studies indicate that healthy eating, physical activity, mental stimulation, not smoking, active social engagement, moderate use of alcohol, maintaining a safe environment, social support, and regular health care are important in maintaining he...More

Fast Facts: Learn! Fast!

What healthy choices should those who are aging make?

  • Choosing a doctor is one of the most important decisions anyone can make. The best time to make that decision is while you are still healthy and have time to really think about all your choices.
  • Studies show that endurance activities help prevent or delay many diseases that seem to come with age. In some cases, endurance activity can also improve chronic diseases or their symptoms.
  • You can improve your health if you move more and eat better!
  • As you grow older, you may need less energy from what you eat, but you still need just as many of the nutrients in food.
  • The Federal Government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strongly encourage older adults to be immunized against flu, pneumococcal disease, tetanus and diphtheria, and chickenpox, as well as measles, mumps, and rubella.
  • Sunlight is a major cause of the skin changes we think of as aging — changes such as wrinkles, dryness, and age spots.

For more information

What medical issues can those who are aging face?

  • Age can bring changes that affect your eyesight.
  • About one-third of Americans older than age 60 and about half the people who are 85 and older have hearing loss. Whether a hearing loss is small (missing certain sounds) or large (being profoundly deaf), it is a serious concern.
  • Menopause is the time around the age of 51 when your body makes much less of the female hormones estrogen and progesterone and you stop having periods, which can cause troublesome symptoms for some women.
  • The risk of osteoporosis grows as you get older. Ten million Americans have osteoporosis, and 8 million of them are women.
  • Prostate problems are common in men age 50 and older. There are many different kinds of prostate problems and treatments vary but prostate problems can often be treated without affecting sexual function.
  • Loss of bladder control is called urinary incontinence and at least 1 in 10 people age 65 or older has this problem.
  • In order to meet the criteria for an Alzheimer's disease diagnosis, a person's cognitive deficits must cause significant impairment in occupational and/or social functioning.

For more information

What mental health issues can those who are aging face?

  • Because the aging process affects how the body handles alcohol, the same amount of alcohol can have a greater effect as a person grows older. Over time, someone whose drinking habits haven’t changed may find she or he has a problem.
  • There are many reasons why depression in older people is often missed or untreated. The good news is that people who are depressed often feel better with the right treatment.

For more information


News Articles

  • 'Prehab' Before Surgery Helps Speed Seniors' Recovery

    "Training" for surgery can improve seniors' outcomes and reduce insurance costs, a new study says. More...

  • Rural Seniors Hurt by Lack of Medical Specialists

    American seniors living in rural areas face a higher risk of hospitalization and death, and a lack of medical specialists may be the reason why, researchers report. More...

  • How Well Are You Aging? A Blood Test Might Tell

    Imagine a blood test that could spot whether you are aging too quickly. New research suggests it's not the stuff of science fiction anymore. More...

  • Taking Several Prescription Drugs May Trigger Serious Side Effects

    Many older Americans take a variety of prescription drugs, yet new research suggests that combining various medications is not always wise. More...

  • Air Pollution May Up Glaucoma Risk

    High levels of air pollution may increase your chances of developing the vision-robbing illness glaucoma, a new study suggests. More...

  • 45 More
    • Even in Small Doses, Air Pollution Harms Older Americans

      Even a little exposure to the fine particles of air pollution can translate into higher hospitalization rates for a number of common conditions among older Americans, a new study suggests. More...

    • Can Air Pollution Take a Toll on Your Memory?

      Air pollution may trigger Alzheimer's-like brain changes and speed memory decline in older adults, a new study suggests. More...

    • AHA News: Obesity, Other Factors May Speed Up Brain Aging

      The brains of middle-age adults may be aging prematurely if they have obesity or other factors linked to cardiovascular disease, new research has found. More...

    • Muscle in Middle Age Might Help Men's Hearts Later

      Middle-aged men who maintain their muscle mass may lower their risk of heart disease as they get older, a new study suggests. More...

    • Fish Oil Rx Slows Clogging in Arteries

      Prescription-strength fish oil slows the development of artery-clogging plaques, according to early results from an ongoing clinical trial. More...

    • Almost Half of Older Americans Fear Dementia, Try Untested Ways to Fight It

      Many Americans believe they are likely to develop dementia -- and they often turn to unproven ways to try to better their odds, a new study suggests. More...

    • People Who Can't Read Face 2-3 Times Higher Dementia Risk

      Could illiteracy up your odds for dementia? That's the suggestion of a study that found seniors who couldn't read or write were two to three times more likely to develop dementia than those who could. More...

    • AHA News: Omega-3 May Boost Brain Health in People With a Common Heart Disease

      The study found taking omega-3 fatty acid supplements was associated with better brain function in people with coronary artery disease, which increases risk for dementia. More...

    • Common Muscle Relaxant Could Pose Mental Dangers for Seniors

      A commonly prescribed muscle relaxant known as baclofen can leave older kidney patients so disoriented that they land in the hospital, a new study warns. More...

    • Education a Buffer Against Alzheimer's Among Blacks: Study

      Higher levels of education may counter the genetic risk of Alzheimer's disease among older black adults, a new study indicates. More...

    • Even a Little Exercise May Bring a Brain Boost

      Just 10 minutes of exercise a day appears to sharpen mental prowess, new research suggests. More...

    • Vitamin D is Key to Muscle Strength in Older Adults

      Vitamin D deficiency is linked with poor muscle health in older adults, a new study finds. More...

    • Many Older Americans Misuse Antibiotics: Poll

      A new poll delivers good and bad news: Half of American seniors report taking antibiotics in the last two years, but many also say they have misused them. More...

    • Many on Medicare Still Face Crippling Medical Bills

      Even with Medicare coverage, older Americans with serious health conditions are often burdened by medical bills, a new study finds. More...

    • Number of Americans With Dementia Will Double by 2040: Report

      Nearly 13 million Americans will have dementia by 2040 -- nearly twice as many as today, a new report says. More...

    • 'Dramatic Increase' Seen in U.S. Deaths From Heart Failure

      Heart failure deaths are reaching epidemic proportions among America's seniors, a new study finds. More...

    • Too Many Seniors Back in Hospital for Infections Treated During First Stay

      The rate of hospital readmissions for seniors with infections that were first treated during their initial hospital stay is too high, researchers report. More...

    • For Seniors, Financial Woes Can Be Forerunner to Alzheimer's

      Unpaid bills, overdrawn accounts, dwindling investments: When seniors begin experiencing fiscal troubles, early dementia or Alzheimer's disease could be an underlying cause, researchers say. More...

    • Get Moving: Exercise Can Help Lower Older Women's Fracture Risk

      Older women who get even light exercise, like a daily walk, may lower their risk of suffering a broken hip, a large study suggests. More...

    • Don't Forget These Tips to Boost Your Memory

      If you have a hard time remembering names or what to get at the supermarket, there are ways to boost your memory. More...

    • Family Can Help Keep Delirium at Bay After Surgery

      Many older hospital patients suffer delirium after surgery, but a new program that involves the patient's family in recovery may help, a new study suggests. More...

    • How to Manage Your Osteoarthritis

      Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting about 31 million Americans, and is the leading cause of disability among adults. More...

    • Health Tip: Brain Games for Seniors

      While research remains inconclusive, there appears to be a correlation between brain games and brain health. More...

    • Your Personality as a Teen May Predict Your Risk of Dementia

      Could your personality as a teen forecast your risk for dementia a half-century later? Very possibly, say researchers, who found that dementia risk is lower among seniors who were calm, mature and energetic high schoolers. More...

    • Steroid Shots for Painful Joints May Make Matters Worse

      Corticosteroid shots are often used to ease arthritis pain, but a new study suggests they may be riskier than thought. More...

    • How Fast You Walk Might Show How Fast You're Aging

      Turns out that the walking speed of 45-year-olds is a pretty solid marker of how their brains and bodies are aging, a new study suggests. More...

    • Standard Memory Tests for Seniors Might Differ by Gender

      Are some tests designed to measure memory declines missing signs of trouble in women? More...

    • AHA News: Growing – and Aging – Hispanic Population at Risk for Dementia

      The Hispanic population over 65 will nearly quadruple in the next 40 years, eventually representing nearly 1 in 5 older Americans. And growing alongside the population will be the daunting challenge of age-related dementia. More...

    • Stroke Rate Continues to Fall Among Older Americans

      Starting in the late 1980s, stroke rates among older Americans began to fall -- and the decline shows no signs of stopping, a new study finds. More...

    • Many U.S. Seniors Are Going Hungry, Study Finds

      Almost 1 in 10 U.S. seniors doesn't have enough food to eat, a new study shows. More...

    • Many Poor, Minority Seniors Get Cancer Diagnosis in the ER

      If you are a senior who is poor or from a minority group, the chances may be higher that you could receive a cancer diagnosis in the emergency room, a new study suggests. More...

    • Give Seniors a Memory Check at Annual Checkups, Experts Say

      Many older people show evidence of mental decline, called mild cognitive impairment, but doctors often miss this sometimes early sign of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. More...

    • For People at High Risk, Evidence That Exercise Might Slow Alzheimer's

      For people at risk of Alzheimer's disease, working out a couple of times a week might at least slow the onset of the illness, new research suggests. More...

    • Staying Healthy Now to Work Into Older Age

      Having one or more chronic health conditions, from diabetes to arthritis, can make it harder to keep working through your 60s and, for those who want or need to, beyond. More...

    • Aggressive Blood Pressure Treatment Does Not Put Seniors at Risk: Study

      Intensive treatment to lower high blood pressure can decrease older adults' risk of sharp blood pressure drops that can cause dizziness and increase the likelihood of falling, a new study says. More...

    • Can Older Women Stop Getting Mammograms?

      Although regular screening mammograms can catch breast cancer early, new research suggests women over 75 who have chronic illnesses can probably skip this test. More...

    • Getting Hitched Might Lower Your Odds for Dementia

      Marriage has been said to deflect depression, stave off stress, even help people live longer. Now a new study says it may also decrease your chance of developing dementia. More...

    • Many Older Americans Aren't Equipped to Weather Hurricanes Like Dorian

      As Hurricane Dorian continues to churn up the east coast of Florida, a new poll shows that many older Americans aren't fully prepared to cope with natural disasters or severe storms. More...

    • How You Can Help Head Off Alzheimer's Disease

      There are a number of things you can do to reduce your risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to an expert. More...

    • Who's Most Likely to Scam a Senior? The Answer May Surprise You

      As people age and their mental capacities decline, they can often be targeted by scammers seeking easy cash. More...

    • AHA News: Time With Grandkids Could Boost Health – Even Lifespan

      Spending time with grandchildren can have positive health impacts. But there is a caveat. Quality is just as important as quantity. More...

    • AHA News: It's Never Too Late to Reap Health Rewards of Exercise, Strength Training

      As people age, physical activity still needs to be part of the game plan for living a healthy, happy life – and experts say it's never too late to get active and build strength. More...

    • Is Your Forgetfulness Reason for Concern?

      Do others tell you that you're forgetful? Do you have a hard time remembering names? More...

    • For Seniors, 'Silent Strokes' Are Common Post-Surgery Threat: Study

      Silent strokes are common in seniors who have had surgery, and may double their risk of mental decline within a year, a Canadian study reports. More...

    • Dodge Dementia With Healthy Lifestyle

      In the study, researchers found that of over 6,300 adults aged 55 and older, those with healthy habits had a lower risk of being diagnosed with dementia over the next 15 years. That was true, at least, for people at low or intermediate risk of dementia because of their genes. More...

Share This

Resources