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Terrorism

Terrorism & War

Terrorism is the use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of the criminal laws of the country for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom. Terrorists often use threats to:

  • Create fear among the public.
  • Try to convince citizens that their government is powerless to prevent terrorism.
  • Get immediate publicity for their causes.

Acts of terrorism include threats of terrorism; assassinations; kidnappings; hijackings; bomb scares and bombings; cyber attacks (computer-based); and the use of chemical, biological, nuclear and radiological weapons.

High-risk targets for acts of terrorism include military and civilian government facilities, international airports, large cities, and high-profile landmarks. Terrorists might also target large public gatherings, water and food supplies, utilities, and corporate centers. Further, terrorists are capable of spreading fear by sending explosives or chemical and bio...More

Fast Facts: Learn! Fast!

What is terrorism?

  • Terrorism is the use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of the criminal laws of the United States for purposes of intimidation, coercion or ransom.
  • Domestic terrorism involves groups or individuals whose terrorist activities are directed at elements of our government or population without foreign direction.
  • International terrorism involves groups or individuals whose terrorist activities are foreign-based and/or directed by countries or groups outside the United States or whose activities transcend national boundaries.
  • Biological agents are infectious microbes or toxins used to produce illness or death in people, animals or plants. They can be dispersed as aerosols or airborne particles.
  • Chemical agents kill or incapacitate people, destroy livestock or ravage crops. Some are odorless and tasteless and are difficult to detect. They can have an immediate effect (a few seconds to a few minutes) or a delayed effect (several hours to several days).

For more information

How can people cope with terrorism and war?

  • The intensity of the process of grieving and working through feelings after an incident will likely be in relationship to how closely you have been impacted.
  • Those people most directly impacted by the violence and death are at heightened risk for experiencing trauma disorders. A trauma disorder occurs (in the broadest sense) when a person is not able to follow a normal process of grief through to resolution, and instead gets stuck in it, reliving the emotions and memories associated with the trauma over and over.
  • If you are a veteran or are caring for one, here are some mental health resources to make the journey a little easier.
  • Discover twenty ideas on positive ways to promote peace in our badly broken world.
  • Learn about some wartime stress survival tips.

For more information


News Articles

  • Mental Ills May Put Veterans at Higher Odds for Heart Trouble

    Veterans who suffer from depression, anxiety, psychosis or bipolar disorder are more likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke or die from heart disease, a new study finds. More...

  • Many Female Veterans Troubled by History of Sexual Assault

    More than one in 10 older female veterans experienced sexual assault while on active duty, a new study shows. More...

  • Vets With Traumatic Brain Injury Have Higher Suicide Risk: Study

    The risk of suicide among U.S. military veterans who have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is more than double that of other vets, a new study finds. More...

  • Dogs Help Injured Vets Cope

    A big floppy-faced St. Bernard saved the life of Army veteran and combat medic Brian Gliba -- but not in the way you might think. More...

  • Longer Rx for Birth Control Pills a Smart Idea for Female Vets: Study

    Giving U.S. female military veterans a year's supply of birth control pills would reduce their risk of unwanted pregnancies and lower health care costs, a new study finds. More...

  • 12 More
    • Soldiers' Odds for Suicide Quadruple When Loaded Gun at Home

      Owning their own firearm, carrying it in public and keeping it loaded in the home: These three factors are each tied to a fourfold rise in the likelihood that a U.S. soldier will take his or her own life, a new report finds. More...

    • American Soldiers' Hearts in Worse Shape Than Civilians'

      New research shatters the image of U.S. soldiers as the epitome of fitness and primed for battle: Instead, they are less likely to have ideal blood pressure than their civilian counterparts. More...

    • 'Exposure Therapy' May Work Best for PTSD Plus Drinking Problems

      For veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) combined with a drinking problem, the type of psychotherapy prescribed can make a difference in recovery rates, a new study finds. More...

    • Legacy of Gulf War Deployment: Higher Risk of Minor Birth Defects

      Here's bad news for some women in the military: An increased risk of minor birth defects was found among U.S. female veterans of the 1990-91 Gulf War. More...

    • Heart Disease a Growing Threat to U.S. Veterans

      More U.S. veterans are at increased risk for heart disease, a looming public health problem, researchers say. More...

    • Vets Who Get Opioids From VA, Medicare at Higher Overdose Risk

      Many military veterans can get prescription opioid painkillers from both the VA and Medicare, putting them at nearly triple the risk for an overdose, new research warns. More...

    • Does PTSD Really Harm Veterans' Hearts?

      By itself, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) doesn't raise the risk of heart disease for U.S. veterans, a new study finds. More...

    • Head, Neck Cancers Up Among 9-11 Responders: Study

      Head and neck cancers among a group of first responders to the 9/11 World Trade Center terrorist attacks are significantly higher than expected, a new study says. More...

    • Certain Female Vets May Face Higher Dementia Risk

      The toll of U.S. military service can be steep for female veterans, with depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and brain injury each significantly raising the odds of later dementia, new research suggests. More...

    • Mental Health Help Becoming Less of a Stigma in Military

      Active-duty members of the U.S. military are much more open to the idea of mental health counseling than veterans, a new survey finds. More...

    • Firsthand 9/11 Exposure Fueling Alcohol- and Drug-Related Deaths: Study

      People directly exposed to the World Trade Center terrorist attacks appear at increased risk of drug- and alcohol-related death, a new study finds. More...

    • U.S. Soldier in Custody Following Slaying of 5 Americans in Iraq

      An American soldier has been charged with five specifications of murder and one of aggravated assault in Baghdad. More...

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